Music

Browsing Roaming the Arts quickly leads to the understanding that music was the inspiration for creating this type of non-commercial web presence devoted to exposing artists to a wider audience, build their fan base, and drive traffic to their websites. Most of the musicians posted so far have been seen by us in live performance or are actively being followed, awaiting an opportunity for live entertainment to return to the fold. Each post has an embedded video chosen to entertain and give a sense of the artists style. Continuing on to “Visit Site” will take you to the artist website to check schedules, new releases, and a variety of information and links to videos.

Marcus King

Lead singer and guitarist for The Marcus King Band, 25-year-old Marcus King has a lot of experience under his belt despite his young age. With over a decade of performing live, King has already made a name for himself among today’s top indie artists. Not many musicians can claim to be a professional by the age of eleven! With King’s dedication to his craft, he has sought to revamp the indie music industry through his unique spin on the genre. Read on to learn more about The Marcus King band from Roaming the Arts.

Marcus King And The Early Years Of His Life

Music was a huge factor in King’s upbringing. With a four-generation legacy of musicians in the family, King seemed to be destined to leave his mark on music as well. Learning from both his father and his grandfather, Marcus King learned how to play the guitar by the tender age of just four years old. His passion for the guitar has only grown with time, prompting the design of the Marcus King Gibson ES 345, a custom vintage design inspired by the Blue Ridge Mountains King called home. Talent for string instruments can be traced back to King’s great-grandfather, who was an avid fiddler. With his grandfather transitioning from fiddle to guitar, and dear ol’ dad being a professional guitarist himself, King certainly had a lot of talent to learn from.

Further Inspiration For King’s Unique Brand Of Music

Through his upbringing in Greenville, South Carolina, much of the influence for The Marcus King Band can be attributed to his hometown. The indie music artist can be described as a powerhouse combination of classic rock-n-roll blended with soul and country influences. Some inspiration for this sound can be seen from King’s father, guitarist and singer Marvin King, who is known for his own band, Marvin King and The Blues Revival. King’s grandfather lent his guitar expertise to the country scene, contributing again to the type of music King would later showcase. 

Where The Marcus King Band Is Today

Alongside Marcus King (guitar and vocals), The Marcus King Band is made up of members Stephen Campbell (bass), Dean Mitchell (sax and guitar), Justin Johnson (trombone and trumpet), and Jack Ryan (drummer). The five musicians have been performing together since 2013 – That’s 8 years performing as the Marcus King Band! Their record, El Dorado, is out now and available to be enjoyed by music lovers everywhere! The group is currently located in Nashville, Tennessee, where they continue to write and perform music regularly. Concert information can be found on their website, along with all of the latest updates on The Marcus King Band.

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Looking to stay up to date on the latest in indie rock trends? Visit us at Roaming the Arts for more top indie artists like The Marcus King Band. We strive to update you with the top performers and more. Find us on your favourite social media sites to always stay up to date on the latest and the hottest topics Roaming the Arts can offer.

Scary Pockets

Scary Pockets

An Incredible Cover Band From The LA Music Scene

Scary Pockets are a dynamic funk band formed from the LA music scene (Los Angeles, USA). The band consists of Ryan Lerman and Jack Conte who are joined by a continuously rotating line up of quality musicians to form Scary Pockets.

Ryan Lerman spent his twenties touring as a bassist for the American singer-songwriter, Ben Folds. He also has performed as a guitarist for Micheal Bublé and as a musical director for John Legend. A very impressive back catalog of performance history. The other half of Scary Pockets, Jack Conte, is an American musician, singer-songwriter, disc jockey, entrepreneur, and filmmaker. When these two talented individuals mix their skills together, along with some of the best session musicians from the LA music scene, the results are phenomenal.

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Allman Betts Band

Allman Betts Band

Devon Allman and Duane Betts unite in this exciting band.

Back in the Road.

The Allman Betts Band includes Devon Allman & Duane Betts on guitars and vocals, Berry Oakley Jr. on bass, Johnny Stachela on slide guitar, John Ginty on Hammond B3 (Robert Randolph/Dixie Chicks) and Devon Allman Project percussionists R. Scott Bryan (Sheryl Crow) and John Lum.  The show features original music from their two recent BMG albums, songs from their solo projects as well as classic songs by The Allman Brothers Band, the legendary group founded by Devon and Duane’s fathers, Gregg Allman & Dickey Betts.

Their sophomore album, Bless Your Heart, was released on August 28, 2020.  Like their debut album, Bless Your Heart was recorded at the legendary Muscle Shoals Sound Studios and produced by Matt Ross-Spang (Jason Isbell, Margo Price, John Prine and Elvis Presley).

“This is The Allman Betts Band’s best offering yet, showcasing a band still tethered to their legacy but finding their own way with a sound that honors their roots without stepping all over them.” – No Depression

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How To Safely Attend Summer Concerts After Being Vaccinated

Now that you have been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, you may be asking yourself when it will be safe to attend a concert again? We here at Roaming The Arts would like to help you answer that question. More specifically, summer concerts are right around the corner, and we would like to give you the information you need to attend safely. Whether you will see a group of indie music artists or watch a solo performance, safety precautions should still be taken. Although the number of Americans in the US vaccinated against COVID-19 is increasing daily, the risk of contracting the virus is still high in large indoor gatherings and crowds. Here is what you need to know to attend safely.  

 

How To Prepare For Summer Concerts

 

You should take a few steps before purchasing your tickets to ensure that the venue is following along with CDC guidelines for safe gatherings. Contact the venue via phone or online to check for the following things: 

  • Is the event located indoors or outdoors? (Indie music artists are known for large outdoor festivals)
  • If the event is indoors, is their ventilation system up to code?
  • Are they following social distancing guidelines?
  • Are face masks required at all times?
  • Is there access to sanitation stations and washing stations?

 

Getting answers to these questions will help ease your mind and ensure that the event is up to safety standards. If you have any issues getting straight answers from the venue, it may be safe to assume that the proper precautions have not been taken, and maybe you should skip that event.   

 

Taking A Road Trip To That Concert?

 

If your concert plans include a road trip, there are a few things you should keep in mind. Although you have been vaccinated, you will inevitably be surrounded by many who are not, both on your way to the event and while at the event. A mask should be worn during any pit stops along the way, such as bathroom breaks, stopping for food, and fueling up. Also, remember to social distance by at least 6 feet and thoroughly wash your hands or sanitize them immediately after any stops. 

 

What To Know When You Get There

 

Planning for your first concert outing since COVID-19 hit the US may seem daunting, but your hard work and preparation will pay off. Give yourself a little wiggle room regarding arrival time because the check-in process may require a temperature check upon entry. It is better to be at the front of a long line as opposed to the back of one! Also, make sure you have your face mask and a couple of extras just in case. Festivals featuring many indie music artists may look different this year, and you may need to plan to bring a supply of food and water for the event due to ongoing restrictions. Finally, do your best to maintain 6 feet of social distancing, although the CDC highly recommends 10 feet. 

 

Contact Us

 

All of us here at Roaming The Arts dedicate ourselves to helping you stay connected and plan your next outing to summer concerts here in the US. Contact us today for more information.

Samantha Fish

Samantha Fish

A blues musician from Kansas City, Missouri, Samantha Fish impressed industry professionals as a teenager before scoring her first Billboard blues number one in her mid-twenties. Fish grew up in a musical family with a variety of genres, including a steady diet of classic rock radio. Her father played guitar and would sometimes jam with friends at home. Young Samantha started out as a drummer but switched to guitar at the age of 15. As a teen, she would sneak into local blues landmark the Knuckleheads Saloon to hear touring musicians, and she began sitting in with them from time to time after she became legal at 18.

Girls with Guitars In 2009, Fish recorded the live album Live Bait as the Samantha Fish Blues Band, and the rock-edged guitar work brought her to the attention of Ruf Records. The label featured her alongside Cassie Taylor and Dani Wilde on the 2011 release Girls with Guitars, which featured covers of the Rolling Stones and the Steve Miller Band as well as original material from the three guitarist/singer/songwriters. Later that same year, Fish released her solo debut, Runaway, also with Ruf Records. It was produced by mentor and frequent collaborator Mike Zito.

Black Wind Howlin' She saw her first chart success with her sophomore LP, Black Wind Howlin’, also produced by Zito. It hit the Billboard Heatseekers chart and reached the Top Ten of the blues albums chart upon release in 2013. She followed it with Wild at Heart in 2015, which became a blues number one. In 2017, she returned with her fourth studio album, Chills & Fever. Recorded in Detroit with members of the Detroit Cobras it featured covers of obscure pop and soul tunes.

Also in 2017, Fish issued Belle of the West, recorded in Missouri with Luther Dickinson and featuring musical contributions by guitarist/harmonica player Lightnin’ Malcolm, former-Squirrel Nut Zipper Jimbo Mathus, violinist Lillie Mae Rische, and others. The album helped the guitarist pick up a 2018 Blues Music Association award for Contemporary Female Artist of the Year. Fish‘s seventh studio album, Kill or Be Kind, arrived in 2019 and found her working with producer Scott Billington in Memphis.

Artist Biography by Marcy Donelson

(For all “red links” above, please use back button to return here – see AllMusic.com to browse their site)

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Why & How You Should Support Artists During COVID

 

It’s time to support artists

The music industry and local musical artists have had to navigate their careers differently since the Covid-19 lockdown. It’s very important for us as consumers to continue to support our favorite music artists, especially during the Covid-19 pandemic. People throughout the United States are struggling during this time. Millions of people are unemployed and are unable to return to work. Thousands of businesses have shut down and even music artists are having trouble making money during this time. Music artists are unable to make money while on a tour which is greatly affecting their ability to earn income. Many bands and hip-hop artists have pointed out in the past that the majority of the money they make is on tour. Even indie artists make a large portion of here money touring local areas to keep the band going. Consumers should try to support their favorite artists so they can stay intact. Artists are unable to have in-person events and signings which can be so exciting and beneficial to the artist. Spotify and streaming services do not pay artists large amounts of money. In 2020 physical albums are almost non-existent and most music is available for free. Roaming the Arts has an online community that supports musicians, artists, and writers. Now is the time for consumers to stand up and support artists during this difficult time!

 

Ways to Support Artists During Covid

 

  • Branding and promotion can be so beneficial to musical artists. Spreading your favorite artist’s music on social media can be so helpful to them. Retweets and posts on Instagram can during this time will e greatly appreciated.
  • You can share music and resources within your circle of friends
  • Encourage your friends to support their favorite artists. Buy and stream most as often as you can.
  • Tweet and reach out to your favorite artists and tell them how much you love and appreciate their music. Bands and rappers need to know their fans still want them to keep releasing must and that they will be first in line to buy their tickets once they can go on tour again. If you are employed or cannot work it’s fully understandable if you cannot financially support your favorite artists. The smallest things such as a tweet or direct message will always be appreciated. This can potentially help boost sales.
  • Music streaming sites don’t pay large amounts of money but they still make up nearly 20% of an artist’s income. If you consumers can accumulate enough stream it definitely can be beneficial to an artist. Streaming sites are even introducing tipping options. If you would like to you can support artists by sending them money directly. Establishing more revenue flow can be so helpful to struggling indie artists.
  • Many artists have YouTube channels and live streams where you can come support them I’ve seen many artists focus more on making content and releasing music on youtube to make a living.
  • It’s time to support artists!!!

Band of Heathens

Band of Heathens

Performance Video — Heaven Help Us All

When The Band of Heathens decided to dub their sixth studio album of original material Stranger (its first since 2017’s Duende), the veteran band, formed in Austin, TX nearly 15 years ago, had no idea how prophetic that title would turn out to be. Although the name references the famed existential Albert Camus novel and Robert Heinlein’s sci-fi classic Stranger in a Strange Land, it also touches on the “strangers” who make up the band’s loyal fan base, who supported the band during this period with all touring canceled.

As co-founder Ed Jurdi acknowledges, it is certainly an unusual time to release a new album. “The strangest,” he says. “Maybe no time stranger. Since we started, there have been sweeping, revolutionary changes in the music business, but, in this global pandemic, we’re just a microcosm.”
“We’re really fortunate that we have been able to turn directly to our fan base during the pandemic,” adds fellow co-founder Gordy Quist. “The last few months we’ve spent four nights a week live-streaming personal private concerts to fans, and one night a week publicly live-streaming with the whole band Zooming in from their respective homes in California, Texas, North Carolina and Tennessee. At first it seemed very strange until
these walls started coming down and we realized how connected we are by the fabric of music.”

Extending the metaphor of Stranger even further. The Band of Heathens traveled to another city, Portland, OR, with a brand-new producer, Tucker Martine [The Decemberists, My Morning Jacket, Modest Mouse, Camera Obscura], and the result is something different – a more airy, intimate atmosphere, with added emphasis on songcraft and intricate arrangements set in a spacious sonic landscape that reinvents the band’s sound. These are songs stripped of pretense, but teeming with the emotion borne of personal experience, as has been The Band of Heathens’ method from the very start. Stranger moves off into a new place, but still echoes the group’s artful songwriting and multi-layered narrative observations.

The Stranger was released in 2020 and is a top ten roots rock album riding high in the charts.

 

Nataniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats

Nataniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats

Nathaniel David Rateliff is an American singer and songwriter based in Denver, whose influences are described as folk, Americana and vintage rhythm & blues. Rateliff has garnered attention with Nathaniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats, the soulful R&B combo he formed in 2013. Wikipedia

How To Find New Rock Artists You Might Love

Everybody gets in a musical rut once in a while. Are you on the hunt for something new to capture that feeling you had way back when? Just clicking through Spotify or Pandora may not be enough due to how our brains work. While allowing a streaming service to choose songs for us can sometimes work, it’s not the best way to find new jams. Read on to learn more about some tips to find new music so that you can lift your mood with some new rock artists and shake off that routine! Roaming The Arts is a music curation platform whose goal is to promote other musicians/authors/artists. Visit Roaming The Arts to discover some new rock, classical, and indie musicians today!  

Try Roaming the Arts Radio – check out the 2020 Time Capsule

Finding New Rock Artists

The first thing we should get out of the way is that old music isn’t always better, you were just younger and more impressionable when  it came out. Many people have the mindset that modern music is “not good,” which is not the case. The real story is that newer music just isn’t  hitting you emotionally the same way that stuff you liked in your youth did. Older brains are quite resistant to forming new connections to music, and tend to prefer music from our formative years to the exclusion of pretty much everything else. When you look for new music,  it’s important to clear your head and eliminate as many distractions as possible. There’s no wrong answer on how to find new music; your goal should be just to consume as much new media as you can, while enjoying the tunes. Kick back with your favorite drink in a comfortable pad, and let the tunes take you back to your happy place. Some useful implements include music streaming service and some way to enjoy the streaming service such as good speakers or headphones. Of course, while you’re going through this music discovery process, make sure to be mindful of your surroundings and those who live in you. 

Our world of 2020 is offering very limited live performances, so check out BandsInTown for a daily guide to nationally known artists who are streaming a performance.

Tips To Find New Music 

When finding new music, make sure to check out our reviews of each streaming service in order to figure out how to find new music with each. For many streaming apps there’s a “radio” setting, and sometimes you may want to continually make new radio stations  when  you find another song you enjoy in that same auto-generated playlist. Keep repeating this process until the radio station you make begins to match your mood. Some other tips to enjoy are:

  • Change how you listen, such as using Amazon Music or Tidal rather than Spotify
  • Watch your favorite movies and add their soundtracks to your library
  • Check out the background tracks to your favorite YouTube videos
  • Find artists that work with your favorite bands

Of course, these suggestions can only point you to where to look for- putting yourself in a situation that lets you form a fond memory or connection to the cues that would bring back a positive emotional response.

Contact Us Today

Are you looking for ways to fall in love with some new rock and indie artists? Roaming The Arts is a place for you to find new music anywhere in the US.  Email Roaming The Arts to find out more today!

The Pretenders/Chrissie Hynde

The Pretenders/Chrissie Hynde

Over the years, the Pretenders became a vehicle for guitarist/vocalist Chrissie Hynde’s songwriting, yet they were a full-fledged band when they formed in the late ’70s. With their initial records, the group crossed the bridge between punk/new wave and Top 40 pop more than any other band, recording a series of hard, spiky singles that were also melodic and immediately accessible. Hynde was an invigorating singer who bent the traditional male roles of rock & roll to her own liking, while guitarist James Honeyman-Scott created a sonic palette filled with suspended chords, effects pedals, and syncopated rhythms that proved remarkably influential over the next two decades. After Honeyman-Scott’s death, the Pretenders became a straightforward rock band, yet Hynde’s semi-autobiographical songwriting and bracing determination meant that the group never became just another rock band, even when their music became smoother and pop-oriented.
Originally from Akron, Ohio, Hynde moved to England in the early ’70s, when she was in her twenties. British rock journalist Nick Kent helped her begin writing for New Musical Express; she wrote for the newspaper during the mid-’70s. She also worked in Malcolm McLaren’s SEX boutique before she began performing. After playing with Chris Spedding, she joined Jack Rabbit; she quickly left the band and formed the Berk Brothers.
In 1978, Hynde formed the Pretenders, which eventually consisted of Honeyman-Scott, bassist Pete Farndon, and drummer Martin Chambers. Later in the year, they recorded a version of Ray Davies’ “Stop Your Sobbing,” produced by Nick Lowe. The single made it into the British Top 40 in early 1979. “Kid” and “Brass in Pocket,” the group’s next two singles, were also successful. Their debut album, Pretenders, was released in early 1980 and eventually climbed to number one in the U.K. The band was nearly as successful in America, with the album reaching the Top Ten and “Brass in Pocket” reaching number 14.
During an American tour in 1980, Hynde met Ray Davies and the two fell in love. Following a spring 1981 EP, Extended Play, the group released their second album, Pretenders II. Although it fared well on the charts, it repeated the musical ideas of their debut. In June of 1982, Pete Farndon was kicked out of the band due to his drug abuse. A mere two days later, on June 16, James Honeyman-Scott was found dead of an overdose of heroin and cocaine. Pregnant with Davies’ child, Hynde went into seclusion following Honeyman-Scott’s death. In 1983, two months after Hynde gave birth, Farndon also died of a drug overdose.
Hynde regrouped the Pretenders in 1983, adding former Manfred Mann’s Earth Band guitarist Robbie McIntosh and bassist Malcolm Foster; the reconstituted band released “2000 Miles” in time for Christmas. The new Pretenders released Learning to Crawl early in 1984 to positive reviews and commercial success. Ending her romance with Ray Davies, Hynde married Jim Kerr, the lead vocalist of Simple Minds, in May of 1984.
Apart from a performance at Live Aid, the only musical activity from the Pretenders in 1985 was Hynde’s appearance on UB40’s version of “I Got You Babe.” Hynde assembled another version of the Pretenders for 1986’s Get Close. Only she and McIntosh remained from Learning to Crawl; the rest of the album was recorded with session musicians. Get Close showed the Pretenders moving closer to MOR territory, with the bouncy single “Don’t Get Me Wrong” making its way into the American Top Ten in 1987. Hynde recorded another duet with UB40 in 1988, a cover of Dusty Springfield’s “Breakfast in Bed.”
Hynde’s marriage to Kerr fell apart in 1990, the same year Packed! was released, although it failed to ignite the charts in either America or Britain. Hynde was relatively quiet for the next few years, re-emerging in 1994 with Last of the Independents, which was hailed as a comeback by some quarters of the press. The album did return the Pretenders to the Top 40, with the ballad “I’ll Stand by You.” In the fall of 1995, the live album Isle of View was released, then the group remained silent for a few years. Hynde finally returned in 1999 with an album of new material, Viva el Amor. Three years later, the Pretenders left their longtime label for Artemis. The reggae-tinged Loose Screw appeared in November and a tour followed in January 2003. In March 2006, the band released their first-ever box set, Pirate Radio, via Rhino. The four-disc package included over five hours of music and a DVD of rare performances. Two years later, the Pretenders released Break Up the Concrete, their first album in six years; it debuted at 32 on the Billboard charts and 35 in the U.K.
Following the release of Break Up the Concrete, the Pretenders spent the next few years touring, but after 2012, Hynde put the band on hiatus. In 2014, she released Stockholm, her first-ever solo album, which was followed in 2015 by her memoir Reckless: My Life as a Pretender. In 2016, Hynde revived the Pretenders to record a new album with Black Keys guitarist Dan Auerbach as producer. Alone emerged in October 2016. 2019 saw the belated release of The Pretenders with Friends, a CD, DVD, and Blu-ray package that documented both sound and images from a 2006 concert in which Hynde and her bandmates were joined on-stage by Iggy Pop, Shirley Manson of Garbage, and members of Incubus and Kings of Leon. The Pretenders reunited with producer Stephen Street for 2020’s Hate for Sale, which also was the first album since Loose Screw to feature Chambers on drums. ~ Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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