Authors

Book Club Reads – 20 for 20

Culled from the favorites of three east coast book clubs.

Please write to us with your book club favorites – info@roamingthearts.com

American Dirt- Jeannine Cummins
Apeirogon-Colum McCann
Ask Again, Yes –Mary Beth Keane
Behold The Dreamers –Imbolo Mbue
Bel Canto –Ann Patchett
Born A Crime- Trevor Noah
Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine – Gail Honeyman
Fates and Furfies – Lauren Groff
In The Midst of Winter – Isabel Allende
Mrs. Hemingway – Naomi Wood
Pachinko –Min Jin Lee
Tattooist Artist of Auschwitz – Heather Morris
The Extraordinary life of Sam Hell- Robert Dugoni
The Great Alone – Kristin Hannah
The Great Believers –Rebecca Makkai
The Inn At Lake Devine –Elinor Lipman
The Man with a Load of Mischief –Martha Grimes
The Snow Child – Eowyn Ivey
The Storyteller’s Secret – Sejal Badani
This Tender Land-William Kent Krueger

Don Winslow

Don Winslow’s latest is “Broken.”

In six intense short novels connected by the themes of crime, corruption, vengeance, justice, loss, betrayal, guilt and redemption, Broken is #1 international bestseller Don Winslow at his nerve-shattering, heart-stopping, heartbreaking best. In Broken, he creates a world of high-level thieves and low-life crooks, obsessed cops struggling with life on and off the job, private detectives, dope dealers, bounty hunters and fugitives, the lost souls driving without headlights through the dark night on the American criminal highway.

With his trademark blend of insight, humanity, humor, action and the highest level of literary craftsmanship, Winslow delivers a collection of tales that will become classics of crime fiction.

Of all the blows delivered by Don Winslow’s Cartel trilogy, none may be as devastating as the timing of “The Border,” its stunner of a conclusion. Though Winslow cannot have engineered all of this 14 years ago when he started this series, his sweeping new novel concerns subjects that put it right on the culture’s front burner: the Mexican-American border, the handling of migrant children, the opioid crisis and some barely fictionalized claims about how foreign money has bought influence at the highest level of the U.S. government.

The book’s title, “The Border,” refers to both physical and moral barriers. Winslow is well aware that both that and its cover image, which depicts a razor-wire-topped wall spreading across a desert landscape, are politically loaded. “Loaded phrases, like loaded guns, are more interesting, aren’t they?” Winslow said to Entertainment Weekly in September. As for the book’s depiction of fiercely partisan American politics, including its treatment of characters who are unmistakable versions of the current president and his son-in-law: “I know this book is going to make some people angry. I can live with that.”

Even though the first installment of this trilogy was named “The Power of the Dog,” after a biblical intimation of evil (“Deliver my soul from the sword; my love from the power of the dog,” Psalms 22:20), it only hinted at the magnitude and ferocity of what was to come. That opening novel now looks like the series’ relatively innocent prologue — and it is as blade-sharp, violent, pulse-quickening and reportorially shocking as the pinnacle of some lesser series might be.

“The Power of the Dog” is, in brief, about the first decades that bind the destinies of Art Keller, a Vietnam veteran and later D.E.A. agent, and Adán Barrera, a young Mexican who will go on to achieve the most dizzying heights of power. The book begins in a burning Mexican poppy field in 1975 (“Only in hell, Art Keller thinks, do flowers bloom fire”) and leaves Keller among more poppies in 2004. Many unspeakable acts happen in between, melding the personal with the political (Iran-contra). It is all rendered unputdownable by Winslow’s unrivaled skill at his game.

Steve Ulfelder

Steve Ulfelder is the author of four mystery novels featuring unlikely hero Conway Sax. He’s also a freelance writer and co-owner of an auto-racing business.

Purgatory Chasm, Steve’s debut, was published by Minotaur/Thomas Dunne Books in 2011. It was nominated for the Edgar and Anthony Awards in the Best First Novel category, and was named Best First Mystery by RT Book Reviews. The second Conway Sax novel, The Whole Lie, was published in 2012, with Shotgun Lullaby following in 2013. Book four, Wolverine Bros. Freight & Storage, was named Best PI Novel of 2014 by the Sons of Spade blog.

A new hero and new series : One Mississippi – Available now

Archer Dixon: 37 years old, Ivy educated, smart, funny, well read – but he never has amounted to much. He’s been reduced to bartering handyman services for a roof over his head. Having staggered all his life from job to job, Arch is a newly minted private detective. His first case looks easy-peasy – but when he starts digging, things quickly grow tangled. Before Arch knows it, he’s in the middle of a gang war between Nigerian car thieves and murderous Russians.

Hank Phillippi Ryan

Location-Boston

A nationally bestselling author of 11 mystery novels, Ryan has won multiple prestigious awards for her crime fiction: five Agathas, three Anthonys, the Daphne, two Macavitys, and for The Other Woman, the coveted Mary Higgins Clark Award. National reviews have called her a “master at crafting suspenseful mysteries” and “a superb and gifted storyteller.”

Timothy Hallinan

Locations-Bangkok & Los Angeles

Timothy Hallinan is the award-winning author of twenty highly praised novels. He currently writes two series: the Poke Rafferty Bangkok Thrillers, focused on a Thailand-based American travel writer and his cross-cultural family, the fourth volume of which, The Queen of Patpong, was nominated for the Edgar award; and the Junior Bender Mysteries, about a Los Angeles burglar who moonlights, usually reluctantly, as a private eye for crooks. The Junior Bender series is under development for global cable television and the fourth book in the series, Herbie’s Game, won the 2015 Lefty as Best Humorous Crime Novel. The latest Rafferty book, The Hot Countries, was named one of the best books of 2015 by Library Journal and The Strand Magazine and was nominated for the Macavity award.

In addition to the Lefty, the Edgar, and the Macavity, Hallinan’s books have been nominated for the Shamus and Nero award.

Ann Beattie

American writer of short stories and novels whose characters, having come of age in the 1960s, often have difficulties adjusting to the cultural values of later generations. Beattie graduated from the American University in Washington, D.C., in 1969 and received a master of arts degree from the University of Connecticut in 1970. Her short stories were published in The New Yorker and other literary magazines beginning in the early 1970s. She published her first collection of stories, Distortions, in 1976. Her first novel, Chilly Scenes of Winter, also appeared in 1976; it was subsequently adapted as the film Head over Heels (1979), which was later rereleased as Chilly Scenes of Winter (1982).

Suzanne Berne

Suzanne Berne is an American novelist known for her foreboding character studies involving unexpected domestic and psychological drama in bucolic suburban settings. Wikipedia

Paul Levine

Location-South Florida

Paul Levine is an American author of crime fiction, particularly legal thrillers. He has written two series, known generally by the names of the protagonists: Jake Lassiter and Solomon vs. Lord. His novels have been translated into 21 languages. Wikipedia

Phillip Margolin

Location – Oregon

A great collection of legal thrillers written over a span of forty years.

T. Jefferson Parker

LocationSan Diego/Southern California

T. Jefferson Parker was born in Los Angeles and has lived all his life in Southern California. He was educated in public schools in Orange County, and earned a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of California, Irvine, in 1976.
His writing career began in 1978, with a job as a cub reporter on the weekly newspaper, The Newport Ensign. After covering police, city hall and cultural stories for the Ensign, Parker moved on to the Daily Pilot newspaper, where he won three Orange County Press Club awards for his articles. All the while he was tucking away stories and information that he would use in his first book.

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